On March 3rd, the Canadian photojournalist and biologist Nick Hawkins found over 80 blacktip shark (Carcharhinus limbatus) heads and dead bodies off western Cabuya Island, in direction of Cabo Blanco Absolute Natural Reserve.  The finding happened when Hawkins was exploring the area while photographing for a conservation project on the Nicoya Peninsula.

_DSC5126The majority of the sharks were small in size, which could indicate that this site is an important breeding area for this species, where juveniles feed before they move to the high seas.

Nick Hawkins quotes, “I spent over 30 minutes collecting heads and bodies for a photo, I collected around 80 but there were still many more scattered about a larger area. All of the sharks were juveniles and some were fully intact, killed needlessly and then discarded.”

“Unfortunately, this is not an isolated incident.  There are almost 30 commercial shark species in the Pacific of Costa Rica and these are caught for the high value of their fins but also for national meat consumption, especially the young individuals that haven’t reproduce yet, as in this case” states Randall Arauz of Pretoma.  “One more time, this encounter shows the great fishing pressures on sharks and the urgent need to expand and create marine protected areas in coastal zones where the shark feed during juvenile stages” concluded Arauz.

For more information:

Nick Hawkins – nickjameshawkins@gmail.com – http://www.njhawkins.com/

Pretoma, info@pretoma.org, (506) 22415227

Share it! / ¡Compartir!
    MiguelPress Releases
    On March 3rd, the Canadian photojournalist and biologist Nick Hawkins found over 80 blacktip shark (Carcharhinus limbatus) heads and dead bodies off western Cabuya Island, in direction of Cabo Blanco Absolute Natural Reserve.  The finding happened when Hawkins was exploring the area while photographing for a conservation project on...